2nd International Winter School and Workshop
on Climate/Environment Change

 

Theme: Climate Sensitivity and Feedback

 

Where  : Engineer Building B, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea

When    : January 4-7, 2011

 

The Center for Climate/Environmental Change Prediction Research (CCCPR) at Ewha Womans University (EWU) hosts the 2nd International Winter School and Workshop on Climate/Environment Change on January 4-7, 2011, focusing on climate sensitivity and feedback. Climate sensitivity assesses potential changes in the Earth’s climate system as a response of human’s greenhouse gas emission. Climate sensitivity hinges on climate feedbacks that are associated with many climate/ environmental components: moisture, cloud, precipitation, vegetation, ice, etc. Understanding climate sensitivity and feedback is of particular importance for improving climate prediction. Graduate students and junior scientists around the world who are interested in this topic are strongly encouraged to attend this winter school. Scientists and students who are currently doing researches in this field are invited to submit abstracts to the workshop, which will be held in parallel with the winter school.

 

For the winter school, we have invited three lecturers who are leading scientists in this field in both theoretical and practical aspects

 

  • Prof. Richard S. Lindzen, MIT, USA
  • Prof. Roberto Rondanelli, University of Chile, Chile
  • Dr. Sungsu Park, NCAR, USA

Prof. Richard S. Lindzen, the MIT Sloan Professor of Meteorology, is a world-renowned erudite scholar in climate dynamics and physics. Over 40 years, he has published over 230 papers in climate research. Prof. Roberto Rondanelli is an MIT-trained scientist and is now an assistant professor at University of Chile. He works on tropical cloud/precipitation feedbacks, using a simple model and satellite data. Dr. Sungsu Park is an NCAR scientist who plays a leading role in developing cloud parameterizations in a global climate model called CAM. Our three invited lecturers will provide theoretical backgrounds and the front-end researches in climate sensitivity and feedbacks, exercises in simple and complicated global climate modeling, and analysis techniques of satellite observations.

 

Abstracts (one page) for the workshop should be submitted by October 30, 2010 at www.cccpr.org. Information on registrations for both the workshop and the winter school will be provided later.

 

Questions should be sent to Ms. Nara Hong (CCCPR secretary) at ercewha@gmail.com.

More detailed information can be found in our website at http://www.cccpr.org/

 

Convener: Prof. Seon K. Park, Director, CCCPR/EWU (spark@ewha.ac.kr)

Co-Convener: Prof. Yong-Sang Choi, Assistant Director, CCCPR/EWU (ysc@ewha.ac.kr)

 

Abstracts are for the poster presentations that will be exhibited in the hall during this event. Some distinguished abstracts will be presented orally between the classes.

We will also have an opportunity to introduce each poster by the first author during 3 minutes, between the classes. Travel expenses of selected students from the third countries will be supported by our center.

 

 

[Temporary schedule]

 

 

Jan 4 (Tue)

Jan 5 (Wed)

Jan 6 (Thu)

Jan 7 (Fri)

9:00-10:15

Registration/
Opening ceremony

Rondanelli

Sung-su Park

CCCPR Meeting

Convener:

Prof. Seon K, Park

10:30-11:45

Lindzen

Lindzen

Lindzen

CCCPR Meeting

Co-Convener:

Prof. Yong-Sang Choi

12:00-14:00

Lunch & Break

14:00-15:15

Workshop  Poster Session

Workshop Poster Session

Computing lab (Rondanelli)

Workshop Poster Session

Computing lab 

(Sung-su Park)

 

15:30-16:45

Sung-su Park

Sung-su Park

Rondanelli

 

 

17:00-18:15

Rondanelli

Workshop Distinguished participant talk

Workshop Distinguished   participant talk

 

 

18:30-20:00

Ice breaker

Dinner

Banquet

 

 

 

 

Winter School

 

Workshop

 

CCCPR Meeting

 

 

[Registration Instruction]

 

Abstracts are for the poster presentations that will be exhibited in the hall during this event. Some distinguished abstracts will be presented orally between the classes.

We will also have an opportunity to introduce each poster by the first author during 3 minutes, between the classes. Travel expenses of selected students from the third countries will be supported by our center.

 

Information of Invited Lecturers

Prof. Richard S. Lindzen, Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Meteorology, MITddd

Professor Lindzen is a dynamical meteorologist with interests in the broad topics of climate, planetary waves, monsoon meteorology, planetary atmospheres, and hydrodynamic instability. His research involves studies of the role of the tropics in mid-latitude weather and global heat transport, the moisture budget and its role in global change, the origins of ice ages, seasonal effects in atmospheric transport, stratospheric waves, and the observational determination of climate sensitivity. He has made major contributions to the development of the current theory for the Hadley Circulation, which dominates the atmospheric transport of heat and momentum from the tropics to higher latitudes, and has advanced the understanding of the role of small scale gravity waves in producing the reversal of global temperature gradients at the mesopause.

 

He pioneered the study of how ozone photochemistry, radiative transfer and dynamics interact with each other. He is currently studying the ways in which unstable eddies determine the pole to equator temperature difference, and the nonlinear equilibration of baroclinic instability and the contribution of such instabilities to global heat transport. In the past few years, he has been studying the influence of temperature on cumulus convection and its role in generating cirrus decks. The results so far strongly suggest a powerful negative feedback in climate.

 

He has developed models for the Earth's climate with specific concern for the stability of the ice caps, the sensitivity to increases in CO2, the origin of the 100,000 year cycle in glaciation, and the maintenance of regional variations in climate.

 

Prof. Lindzen is a recipient of the AMS's Meisinger, and Charney Awards, and the AGU's Macelwane Medal. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Fellow of the AAAS. (Ph.D., '64, S.M., '61, A.B., '60, Harvard University)

 

Prof. Roberto Rondanelli, Assistant Professor of Meteorology, University of Chile  ddd

 

Professor Roberto Rondanelli is a junior meteorologist with interests in the behavior of precipitation and clouds in the atmosphere and how their mutual interaction affects climate at different scales. He worked with Prof. Richard Lindzen in quantifying cloud feedbacks (Ph.D. '09, MIT)

 

He is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Geophysics, University of Chile.

Dr. Sungsu Park, Scientist, NCAR  ddd

 

 

Doctor Sungsu Park is a NCAR climate model (CCSM) specialist with interests in cloud parameterization.

 

Research Interests

 

• GCM Modeling - Moist Turbulence, Convection, Cloud Processes

• Stratocumulus and Cumulus Dynamics

• Cloud-Aerosol-Climate Interactions

 

Education


B.S.  Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences (Major) and Physics (Minor)
        Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea

Ph.D. Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences
          University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

          Thesis Advisor : Profs. Conway B. Leovy
          Thesis Title : ENSO-Related Marine Cloud Variations and New Single Column Marine Boundary                             Layer Cloud Modeling

 

Experience

 

Airforce Officer                        Republic of Korea Air Force South Korea                                                                                          (Mar.1995 - Jul.1998)

Graduate Research Assistant   Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences University of Washington, Seattle, WA                                                   (Sep.1998 - Nov.2002)

Postdoc.                                   Advanced Study Program NCAR, Boulder, CO                                                   (Dec.2002 - Dec.2004)

Research Associate                  Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences University of Washington, Seattle, WA                                                   (Jan.2005 - Dec.2008)

Scientist I                                 Climate and Global Dynamics Division NCAR, Boulder, CO                                                   (Jan.2009 - Present)

 

 

 

 

 

Registration for 2011 CCCPR Winter School